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Vibrant Punch Needle Décor (eBook, ePUB)
8,68 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From Wall Art and Pillows to Rugs and Kitchen Accessories-Everything Is Better with Punch NeedleWelcome to Melissa Lowry's colorful world of punch needle. In this all-inclusive beginner's guide, you'll learn how quick and easy it is to dive into creating your own one-of-a-kind, vibrant fiber art décor for your whole home. Punch needle is perfect for beginners and experienced fiber artists alike because it takes the stress out of stitching and is easy on the hands. All you need is a punch needle, some cloth, a frame and your fiber, and you're ready to start punching Melissa's gorgeous designs. Featuring full-size templates, this book makes it simple for anyone to make a professional-quality piece right at home!Inspired by Mexican textiles, these patterns will fill your rooms with unexpected charm and pops of color. Ranging from simple projects that work up quickly like the Flor Hanging Hoop and the Fiesta Rectangle Pillow to small touches like the Carpeta Coasters and Primorosa Table Napkins and even big-impact pieces like the Otomí Storage Cushion and Sarape Rug, you're sure to find the perfect unique statement pieces for your home. Full of soothing geometric patterns and exciting floral designs, this book has all the inspiration and instruction you need to make your life more beautiful.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 11.07.2020
Zum Angebot
Vibrant Punch Needle Décor (eBook, ePUB)
8,68 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

From Wall Art and Pillows to Rugs and Kitchen Accessories-Everything Is Better with Punch NeedleWelcome to Melissa Lowry's colorful world of punch needle. In this all-inclusive beginner's guide, you'll learn how quick and easy it is to dive into creating your own one-of-a-kind, vibrant fiber art décor for your whole home. Punch needle is perfect for beginners and experienced fiber artists alike because it takes the stress out of stitching and is easy on the hands. All you need is a punch needle, some cloth, a frame and your fiber, and you're ready to start punching Melissa's gorgeous designs. Featuring full-size templates, this book makes it simple for anyone to make a professional-quality piece right at home!Inspired by Mexican textiles, these patterns will fill your rooms with unexpected charm and pops of color. Ranging from simple projects that work up quickly like the Flor Hanging Hoop and the Fiesta Rectangle Pillow to small touches like the Carpeta Coasters and Primorosa Table Napkins and even big-impact pieces like the Otomí Storage Cushion and Sarape Rug, you're sure to find the perfect unique statement pieces for your home. Full of soothing geometric patterns and exciting floral designs, this book has all the inspiration and instruction you need to make your life more beautiful.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 11.07.2020
Zum Angebot
Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
49,07 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 11.07.2020
Zum Angebot
Computer Vision: A Modern Approach
49,07 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods. Features + Benefits Broad coverage—Coverage of a wide range of topics allows customization to fit instructor, student, and course needs. Allows instructors to select the most relevant topics for their students and encourages students to enrich their coursework by reading information on other computer vision topics. Most comprehensive and up-to-date text on computer vision—Includes essential topics that either reflect practical significance or are of theoretical importance. Provides students with the most coherent synthesis of current views and teaches them successful techniques for building applications. Depth of the material accessible to various levels of students—Topics are discussed in substantial and increasing depth. While the first half of each chapter is accessible to undergraduates, a good grasp of each chapter provides students with a professional level of skill and knowledge. Application surveys—Describe numerous important application areas such as image based rendering and digital libraries. Teaches students about practical use of techniques and helps them gain insight into the demands of applications. Many important algorithms broken down and illustrated in pseudo code. Enables students to build working systems easily as they can understand the construction of the final application. Excellent pedagogy throughout the text—Includes numerous worked examples, exercises, programming assignments, and extensive illustrations. Provides students with ample opportunity to apply the concepts in the text. I IMAGE FORMATION 1 1 Geometric Camera Models 3 1.1 Image Formation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.1 Pinhole Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.2 Weak Perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.1.3 Cameras with Lenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.1.4 The Human Eye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.2 Intrinsic and Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.2.1 Rigid Transformations and Homogeneous Coordinates . . . . 14 1.2.2 Intrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.2.3 Extrinsic Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.2.4 Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.2.5 Weak-Perspective Projection Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 1.3 Geometric Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 1.3.1 ALinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.2 ANonlinear Approach to Camera Calibration . . . . . . . . . 27 1.4 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2 Light and Shading 32 2.1 Modelling Pixel Brightness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1.1 Reflection at Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 2.1.2 Sources and Their Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 2.1.3 The Lambertian+Specular Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.1.4 Area Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 2.2 Inference from Shading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.2.1 Radiometric Calibration and High Dynamic Range Images . . 38 2.2.2 The Shape of Specularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.2.3 Inferring Lightness and Illumination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.2.4 Photometric Stereo: Shape from Multiple Shaded Images . . 46 2.3 Modelling Interreflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 2.3.1 The Illumination at a Patch Due to an Area Source . . . . . 52 2.3.2 Radiosity and Exitance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 2.3.3 An Interreflection Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 2.3.4 Qualitative Properties of Interreflections . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.4 Shape from One Shaded Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 2.5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 3 Color 68 3.1 Human Color Perception . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.1 Color Matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 3.1.2 Color Receptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3.2 The Physics of Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.1 The Color of Light Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 3.2.2 The Color of Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 3.3 Representing Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.1 Linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 3.3.2 Non-linear Color Spaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 3.4 AModel of Image Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 3.4.1 The Diffuse Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 3.4.2 The Specular Term . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5 Inference from Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.1 Finding Specularities Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 3.5.2 Shadow Removal Using Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 3.5.3 Color Constancy: Surface Color from Image Color . . . . . . 95 3.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 II EARLY VISION: JUST ONE IMAGE 105 4 Linear Filters 107 4.1 Linear Filters and Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.1.1 Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 4.2 Shift Invariant Linear Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 4.2.1 Discrete Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 4.2.2 Continuous Convolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 4.2.3 Edge Effects in Discrete Convolutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3 Spatial Frequency and Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 4.3.1 Fourier Transforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 4.4 Sampling and Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 4.4.1 Sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 4.4.2 Aliasing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4.4.3 Smoothing and Resampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 4.5 Filters as Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.1 Convolution as a Dot Product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 4.5.2 Changing Basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 4.6 Technique: Normalized Correlation and Finding Patterns . . . . . . 132 4.6.1 Controlling the Television by Finding Hands by Normalized Correlation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 4.7 Technique: Scale and Image Pyramids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 4.7.1 The Gaussian Pyramid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 4.7.2 Applications of Scaled Representations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 4.8 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 5 Local Image Features 141 5.1 Computing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 5.1.1 Derivative of Gaussian Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 5.2 Representing the Image Gradient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 5.2.1 Gradient-Based Edge Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 5.2.2 Orientations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 5.3 Finding Corners and Building Neighborhoods . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 5.3.1 Finding Corners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 5.3.2 Using Scale and Orientation to Build a Neighborhood . . . . 151 5.4 Describing Neighborhoods with SIFT and HOG Features . . . . . . 155 5.4.1 SIFT Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 5.4.2 HOG Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 5.5 Computing Local Features in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 5.6 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 6 Texture 164 6.1 Local Texture Representations Using Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 6.1.1 Spots and Bars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 6.1.2 From Filter Outputs to Texture Representation . . . . . . . . 168 6.1.3 Local Texture Representations in Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 170 6.2 Pooled Texture Representations by Discovering Textons . . . . . . . 171 6.2.1 Vector Quantization and Textons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.2.2 K-means Clustering for Vector Quantization . . . . . . . . . . 172 6.3 Synthesizing Textures and Filling Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.1 Synthesis by Sampling Local Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.3.2 Filling in Holes in Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 6.4 Image Denoising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 6.4.1 Non-local Means . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.2 Block Matching 3D (BM3D) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 6.4.3 Learned Sparse Coding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 6.4.4 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Appropriate for upper-division undergraduate- and graduate-level courses in computer vision found in departments of Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering. This textbook provides the most complete treatment of modern computer vision methods by two of the leading authorities in the field. This accessible presentation gives both a general view of the entire computer vision enterprise and also offers sufficient detail for students to be able to build useful applications. Students will learn techniques that have proven to be useful by first-hand experience and a wide range of mathematical methods.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 11.07.2020
Zum Angebot
A Computer Program for Calculating the Circular...
35,90 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Deep drawing process is an important industrial processes where it has been extensively used. It is a process for converting the blank metal to make cylindrical shape in most of the cases. A research program for performing basic calculations related to the product shape was utilized. Eighteen geometric shapes have been selected for the production in this process. The program is include the general equations for this controlling process for each form. When choosing one of the shapes in the program, the dimensions of the desired product are selected. In other words, the inputs to the program are the required dimensions of the product before reaching the required deportation. In addition, diameter, height and other related dimension are computed which were chosen for each stage throughout the operation. Computer program is aimed to help designers templates deep drawing quickly through the implementation of the process, and this exceeds the designer experience that is required to perform the require calculations.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Quantitative TEM Study of Nitride Semiconductors
59,00 € *
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The theoretical part of this work is dedicated to the adaptation of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy for studying III-nitride semiconductors. First, the principle of heterostructure composition evaluation by means of atomic displacement measurement is stated. The comparison of two strain measurement techniques, geometric phase analysis and projection method, is then presented. Finally, the effects of acquisition conditions on the strain measurements were elaborated. The experimental part of this work is dedicated to the characterization of GaN quantum dots (QDs) grown on AlGaN templates. This study revealed several phenomena original for nitride semiconductors. The surface QD shape depends on the GaN layer thickness, whereas the buried QD shape and volume are influenced by the QD capping. Moreover, a phase separation occurs in the AlGaN barriers. To explain the observed phenomena, various models founded on the principle of total energy minimization have been developed. Several approaches, based on the results of this study and aimed for the improvement of the optoelectronic devices properties, are also proposed.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Mucklow, L: Color Me Calm
16,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Our lives become busier with each passing day, and as technology escalates, so does our access to work, obligations, and stress. Constant stimulation and expectation have left us burnt out and distanced from the present moment. 'Now' has become something that happens online, not in the space and time that we physically occupy. Color Me Calm is a guided coloring book designed for harried adults. Art therapist Lacy Mucklow and artist Angela Porter offer up 100 coloring templates all designed to help you get coloring and get relaxed. Organized into seven therapeutically-themed chapters including Mandalas, Water Scenes, Wooded Scenes, Geometric Patterns, Flora & Fauna, Natural Patterns, and Spirituality - the book examines the benefits of putting pencil to paper and offers adults an opportunity to channel their anxiety into satisfying, creative accomplishment. Part of the international bestselling Color Me series, Color Me Calm is the perfect way step back from the stress of everyday life, color, and relax! Don't forget to try Color Me Happy and Color Me Stress-Free!

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Easy-to-Make Stained Glass Boxes: With Full-Siz...
19,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Full-size templates for 42 boxes. Complete instructions cover tools, materials, techniques. Motifs include: floral, butterfly, heart, geometric, more. List of supply sources.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Paint by Sticker Kids: Zoo Animals
18,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Move over, coloring books! Paint by Sticker Kids is back with a second book of amazing art for kids to make, one sticker at a time.Paint by Sticker Kids: Zoo Animals includes everything you need to create 10 bright, playful, full-color illustrations of zoo animals--illustrated templates printed on perforated card stock, and 10 pages of stickers to fill in and create the artwork. The fun, vibrant images are rendered in 'low-poly,' a computer graphics style using geometric polygon shapes to create a 3-D effect. As in paint-by-number, each template is divided into hundreds of spaces, each with a number that corresponds to a particular sticker. Find the sticker, peel it, and place it in the right space. Add the next, and the next, and the next and voila! Animals include a koala, frog, elephant, red panda, puffin, peacock, snake, girafe, tiger, and gorilla. Kids will love watching these pictures come to life. Plus each is suitable for framing or the fridge.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 11.07.2020
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